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KARL

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  1. The victim – who is in his 70s – was found by two members of the public near to Lightoaks Park. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } He was taken to hospital where it was discovered he had suffered a broken neck bone, a fractured nose and multiple cuts and bruises. The man is thought to have been walking down Claremont Road when he felt a blow to the back of his head and witnesses described seeing a man running down Acresfield nearby. Detectives investigating the attack are keen to speak to the man pictured in connection with the incident. Detective Constable Susan West, from GMP’s Salford borough, said: Information can be passed on to police on 0161 856 5360 quoting incident number 2553 of 07/05/18. Alternatively, details can also be passed on anonymously by calling the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.
  2. Salford City Council will provide eight new emergency beds along with 20 self-contained homes where people can stay until long-term settled accommodation is found for them. A new support team will help them overcome any barriers such as finding a deposit, finding accommodation which will take a pet or buying household items to set up home – as well as supporting those still on the streets. Councillor Tracy Kelly, lead member for housing and neighbourhoods, announced the news after launching Salford’s new Homelessness Strategy, which sets out the city’s plans for the next five years. Councillor Kelly said: Councillor Kelly also called for the whole city to pull together to help rough sleepers and people facing the risk of homelessness, saying only an even greater combined effort from the council, NHS, housing and advice services, community and voluntary organisations and residents could tackle the crisis. She said: Councillor Kelly said over the next five years Salford would also focus on providing truly affordable homes and encouraging people in financial difficulties to seek help as soon as possible to avoid the risk of defaulting on payments and losing their homes. Salford City Council is also supporting Greater Manchester-wide initiatives to eradicate the need for rough sleeping. These include the housing first approach of finding rough sleepers homes and then helping them with other issues and a Greater Manchester-wide social lettings agency, which helps vulnerable people and people on low incomes to find and keep private rented homes. You can view the new strategy at www.salford.gov.uk/homelessstrategy Note to editors: Rough sleeping rose from 19 in 2016 to 49 in 2017 as people sleeping in night shelters were also included in the count for the first time.
  3. Salford City Council is warning residents and dog walkers to take extra care in Clifton Country park and along the River Irwell valley and to avoid even the slightest contact with the plant. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } The plant, which is related to cow parsley, has chemicals in tiny hairs under its leaves and sap which can cause the skin to become extremely sensitive to sunlight. Even the slightest brush against a leaf can cause blistering and pain within 15 minutes and both humans and animals can be affected. Sun sensitivity can last for months after contact with the plant and if sap gets into the eyes it can cause blindness. NHS Direct advises anyone who has come into contact with the plant to immediately wash the area with cold water and soap and seek medical advice if they feel unwell. Councillor David Lancaster, lead member for environment and community safety, said: You can find more information about the plant at: www.salford.gov.uk/gianthogweed Photo attached by Fritz Geller-Grimm [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons
  4. The two organisations have teamed up to provide leisure centre staff with training in how to work effectively with disabled people through the Empower You programme. Three Salford Community Leisure team members are the first to qualify and were awarded their certificates at a ceremony at Eccles Leisure Centre recently. James Byrne, Mike Hilton and Ian Thompson were accompanied by disabled gym users and put through an intensive week-long Empower You training programme that included undertaking exercises blindfolded, learning how to describe moves and sensations in depth and finding out more about various health conditions and impairments in relation to physical activities Following the course, Ian Thompson (40), a fitness instructor at Swinton Leisure Centre, said: James Byrne (44), a fitness instructor at Eccles Leisure Centre, said: One of the assessors was 51-year-old Kay Burgin from Kersal in Salford. Kay has spina bifida and has always incorporated physical activity into her life including swimming and gym classes, but it has not always been easy. Said Kay: Mark Chew, Director of Sport and Leisure at Salford Community Leisure, said: Created by Ben Andrews of Unlimited Potential, Empower You is a short-term programme that supports disabled people to overcome barriers and to lead more active lifestyles. Local people who start with Empower You can move on to do activity in mainstream places. Said Ben: Empower You has been funded by NHS Salford Clinical Commissioning Group through its Innovation Fund, and supported by the University of Salford. It has been recognised nationally, with Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, Chair of UKactive, saying “The rest of the country still needs to catch up [with Salford].”
  5. The social housing provider, which owns more than 8,000 homes in Salford, came in at number 11in the prestigious 24Housing Top 50 Landlords 2018 roll of honour. The award recognises the brightest and best social landlords from across the UK, who are delivering significant change both within their organisation and communities and in the wider housing sector. Salix Homes, which only formed as a stand-alone housing association following a stock transfer from Salford Council in 2015, recently launched its #Rethinking Housing campaign, challenging the sector to think differently about how housing services are delivered, to meet the demands of a modern world. Lee Sugden, chief executive at Salix Homes, said: Since launching in 2015, Salix Homes has invested almost £40million improving homes and communities across Salford.
  6. This summer holiday the best-selling picture book 'What The Ladybird Heard' comes to The Lowry stage Wed 1 – Sun 26 August. Written by Julia Donaldson and illustrations by Lydia Monks, Hefty Hugh and Lanky Len have a cunning plan to steal the farmer’s fine prize cow. But they reckon without the tiniest, quietest creature of all: the Ladybird has a plan of her own! Cast member Emma Carroll said, Join the woolly sheep, the hairy hog, the fat red hen and the dainty dog as they take on the villains in this hit musical stage adaptation of What the Ladybird Heard by Julia Donaldson and Lydia Monks, published by Macmillan Children’s Books. This action-packed 55-minute adventure has original songs, live music, puppetry, plenty of audience participation and lots of laughs, making it the perfect treat for families with children aged three and up. The writer of the picture book Julia Donaldson said, What The Ladybird Heard is presented by Kenny Wax Family Entertainment in association with Matthew Gregory. Listings What The Ladybird Heard Live Dates: Wed 1 - Sun 26 August (excluding Mondays) Times: 11am & 2pm Tickets: £16 Website Age guidance: 3+ Access Listings Relaxed Performance: Thu 9 August,2pm Audio Described Performance: Thu 16 August,2pm British Sign Language: Thu 23 August,2pm For more information on Access at The Lowry visit the website
  7. Owners and their furry friends are encouraged to visit Clifton Country Park on Sunday 22 July for a day of doggy delights. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } Running from 11am to 4pm the Dogs in Salford Festival will feature a dog show, agility course and temptation alley. Dogs will be able to get free health checks, chipping and nail clipping thanks to the PDSA. And while their canine companions are being pampered, owners can get a free health check thanks to the Salford Health Improvement team. Councillor David Lancaster, Lead Member for Environment and Community Safety at Salford City Council, said: For children, there is face painting, bouncy castles, fruit animals and guess the breed. The dog show consists of the following categories costing £1 to enter each category. The categories are: •Prettiest Girl sponsored by Rob Hiatt •Best Scruff sponsored by Source 7 •Best Trick sponsored by Four Acres Doggie Day Camp and professional Groomers •Most Handsome Boy sponsored by Doggy's DoLittle •Best Young Handler sponsored by Our Dogs •Waggiest Tail sponsored by Company of Animals •Best Rescue sponsored by The Original Hi K9 •Best Golden Oldie - sponsored by Better Points •Best In Show - judged and presented by Saira Choudhry from Channel 4's No Offence The winners from each category will then be entered into the best in show.
  8. Whilst we’ve all been enjoying the lovely hot weather and despite yesterday's deluge, the lack of rain and high demand for water means that the reservoirs which provide us with the refreshing H2O are now lower than they should be at this time of year. With this in mind, United Utilities who provide us with the wet stuff has taken the decision to introduce a hosepipe ban across most of the North West on the 5th August. This means you won’t be allowed to use either a hosepipe, sprinkler or fill an Olympic sized swimming pool as they use an incredible amount of water. The main restrictions include: Watering a garden and/or plants using a hosepipe Cleaning a private car, van, motorbike, trailer, caravan or leisure boat using a hosepipe Filling or maintaining a domestic swimming pool, paddling pool or ornamental fountain Cleaning walls or windows using a hosepipe Using a water from a hosepipe for domestic recreational use Cleaning paths or patios using a hosepipe Cleaning other artificial outdoor surfaces using a hosepipe. You can still use water outdoors if you: Use tap water to fill a bucket or watering can Use grey water, which is water that’s been used before ie bath water Have your own water supply such as a private borehole. Until the ban is introduced, if you’re able to avoid using garden sprinklers and hosepipes to water your lawns at this time it really will make a big difference. Use a watering can instead or, even better, reuse any water from the home such as water from washing up bowls or bath water. Those not following the ban could face criminal prosecution and a fine of up to £1,000. Whatever you can do to reduce your water usage will help to make sure there is enough water for everyone.
  9. During the long summer break, there is a temptation for young people to get involved in activities that may seem like harmless fun but can be seen differently by other people or carry serious consequences if things get out of hand. Safe4Summer aims to provide young people with enough activities to banish boredom and offers advice about personal safety as well as promoting messages about social responsibility. In addition to offering advice to young people, police are urging the community to help make their local area a safer and more enjoyable place to live. Parents and guardians are advised to maintain a line of communication when their children are out and about and talk to them about personal safety and the dangers of issues such as underage drinking. The wider community is asked to be proactive in reporting any instances of antisocial behaviour to police on 101 or via the new live chat function on the GMP website. PC Natalie Dolan, of Greater Manchester Police, said: Paul Etches, Head of Prevention and Protection at Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service said: Chris Thorpe, the TfGM lead on TravelSafe, said: For more information and to find out what activities for families and young people are happening in your local area visit www.safe4summer.com .
  10. Images taken from the air show cars filling a small layby off the A57 – making it impossible for emergency vehicles to get into the City Heliport. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } If emergency vehicles cannot get to the site the police and air ambulance helicopters, which are used across the whole northwest and beyond, are not allowed to take off. Now Salford City Council is asking motorists only to park in the marked bays along the left-hand side of the layby and warning that anyone who parks anywhere else in the layby risks being given a penalty charge notice of £70. The next match at the stadium is on Friday, July 13 and the stadium, Salford Reds and Sale Sharks are already alerting fans via social media. Councillor David Lancaster, the lead member for environment and community safety, said: Dave Kibblewhite, Base Manager for the National Police Air Service said;
  11. At the moment Salford City Council customer services receive thousands of phone calls from residents each week, and its new Twitter account @SalfordCChelp will mean they get help more quickly. People ring in with a wide range of queries from bins, council tax, parking, traffic, and travel to cycle lanes. Many of these people wait to get through to the team due to the large number of people calling. The new Twitter account will mean there won’t be any need to wait in a queue on the phone. Named, friendly and approachable team members will respond to questions and problems with a helpful reply. They can send a message to the customer services team, Monday to Friday, from 9 to 4.30pm, and it will be replied to quickly with a reference number so people can track what’s happening. If the team is unable to help immediately, they will clearly explain the next steps and pass on the query to a relevant team. Complex issues or private customer details can be sent through a direct message, so people don’t need to worry about sharing this information on Twitter. Councillor Bill Hinds, Lead Member for Finance and Support Services, said: The new Twitter account is part of Salford City Council’s work to help people get the support they need in a variety of different ways. They can use the council’s live webchat service on its website at www.salford.go.uk, post messages on the council’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/salfordcouncil and there are online forms they can also fill in. Any queries between 4.30pm and 9am and on weekends will be dealt with the following working day. People will be made aware each day what time the customer services team will be available the next working day. The council recently won Digital Council of the Year 2018 in the Digital Leaders awards. It has an ongoing scheme called Digital You to help local people learn basic computer and internet skills across the city so they can have a better future and fully take part in today’s society.
  12. Anthony Knight (05/04/1971) was released from prison in May 2018 after being jailed in 2006 for robbery. He has since breached the terms of his license and is now wanted by police. Knight is from the Salford area however his current whereabouts are unknown. Anyone with information about Anthony Knight’s whereabouts should call police on 101 or the independent charity Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111.
  13. TASTY WAY TO BIN ROGUE TRADERS

    Salford City Council is introducing a new taxi-style plate scheme for street traders in the city. By this time next year, every street food trader will have to display an identity plate on their vehicle or stall which also gives their food hygiene rating. To have valid consent, businesses will have to have a food hygiene rating of three stars or more and owners, who will also have to pass a criminal record check, will be provided with identity cards. The new regulations have been brought in to tighten up the existing policies and deter rogue traders from operating in the city. Councillor David Lancaster, Lead Member for Environment and Community Safety at Salford City Council said:
  14. Dr Whittleston, a Fellow of the HEA, picked up the innovative teaching award from the Institution of Structural Engineers for his use of the University’s ground-breaking virtual reality facilities. The Octave, based in Newton is one of the world’s most advanced immersive labs, a sound-and-touch holographic environment used mostly for research. explains Gareth. Collecting the Award was for Innovation in Engineering Education, at Westminster, Gareth added: He invited colleagues to get in touch if they want to find out more about innovative teaching in Civil Engineering.
  15. As part of plans by Manchester City Council to host a screening of the fixture at Castlefield Bowl in Manchester City Centre, extra officers will also be out in force. Some of these officers will be working additional hours on top of their normal shift, while others have given up their rest day and time off so they can help police Wednesday’s event for football fans. GMP has been working with partners and licensed premises throughout this World Cup to help fans across Greater Manchester enjoy the games in good spirits and safe environments. And for this momentous occasion, there will be a significant number of officers in the city centre in particular. An increased police presence will also be seen across Greater Manchester’s town centres for those watching the fixture in pubs and bars. Chief Superintendent Graeme Openshaw, who is in charge of policing during the World Cup, said: Reports to police can be made by calling 101 or 999 in an emergency.
  16. The new system has been running as a pilot for the last six months but now the Force is encouraging people to go online when possible and speak to a specially trained advisor at the click of a button instead of picking up the phone. In response to public feedback, the Force is encouraging people to use it and the information already available on its website in the lead up to England’s game on Wednesday and ahead of Donald Trump’s visit to the UK on Friday, two events that will put increased pressure on policing.Deputy Chief Constable Ian Pilling said: LiveChat can be used between 8am and midnight to: Report a crime Give police information about their local area Get an update on a crime they have already reported Ask an advisor anything police related It’s been introduced to help meet an ever-increasing demand for services online and sees the Force listen to and work with communities to give them the most efficient service possible. Public feedback during a recent consultation highlighted that more and more people want to be able to access services online. During the pilot, GMP’s LiveChat saw 14,237 conversations take place for anything from noise complaints and neighbour disputes right up to disclosures of domestic abuse and modern slavery.
  17. A suspected damaged water pipe has caused part of the A6 in Wardley to collapse this morning. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } United Utilities are on site carrying our emergency repair work The closure is between Moss Lane and Holloway Drive and is affecting routes in the area. The 36, 37, 38, 42, and 149 are all being diverted. Please avoid the area if you can. Photo: Roy Partington via Social Media
  18. The closure is to enable work to take place that will link the new Trafford Park line, currently under construction, with the existing Metrolink network at Pomona. The line will close for 13 days after the last service on Friday 27 July. This means that there will be no tram services running between Cornbrook and Eccles from Saturday 28 July to Thursday 9 August 2018 (inclusive), while services from Ashton-under-Lyne will terminate at Deansgate-Castlefield. It will also enable us to work with Metrolink operator KeolisAmey and other partners to carry out additional enhancement works at the same time, reducing the need for future disruption. The works have been timed to coincide with school summer holidays when, traditionally, fewer people travel on the network. They have also been condensed into a single 13-day closure, preventing disruption over many weekends. We are working hard to minimise disruption to customers and stakeholders and have taken a number of steps to achieve this. We are keeping media, public and stakeholders updated before, during and after the works and extra staff will also be present in key locations and at key times to answer questions and help people get around. During the works there will be a full bus replacement operating including additional services during peak times. Please see the section below to find out where you can pick up your replacement bus service. The travel advice on this page will be continually updated throughout these works and should help you to plan your journey and make travel easier. General Travel Advice Plan ahead and expect journey times to be increased. Replacement bus services will be in operation along the Eccles line during these works. Please ensure you are familiar with replacement bus departure points before you travel. There will be signage directing passengers to replacement bus services at all affected stops. Please ensure you have a valid Metrolink ticket before you travel. Additional Metrolink staff will be available to help and assist you. Follow @OfficialTfGM and @MCRMetrolink for live and up to date travel information and advice throughout the works. Replacement Bus Service A replacement bus service will be in operation along the Eccles line during these works. The following replacement bus services will run: Piccadilly to Eccles calling at all stops, except Pomona (use Exchange Quay) and Broadway (use Harbour City or MediaCityUK) Piccadilly to MediaCityUK calling at all stops except Pomona (use Exchange Quay) Piccadilly to Deansgate-Castlefield, Cornbrook and MediaCityUK Monday to Friday 7am to 9.30am and 3.30pm to 6.30pm You can find your replacement bus stops during these works here. Please note that during the works, no replacement bus service will be able to serve Pomona (use Exchange Quay) and Broadway (use Harbour City or MediaCityUK). Further maps will be added as soon as we have the information. Please ensure you purchase your ticket either on the Metrolink stop or using the getmethere app prior to boarding a replacement bus service.
  19. SALFORD NEEDS AFFORDABLE HOMES

    In a city that is crying out for affordable low-cost, low-rent housing, I am utterly dismayed to read in the Salford Star (http://www.salfordstar.com/article.asp?id=4601) that a proposed application by Salix Homes for such housing at Canon Green Court was recently refused by Salford Councils shambolic planning department. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } To add insult to this, they went on to approve another housing development from Countryside Properties that offered zero affordable homes and zero section 106 money to be used within the local community. Do these imbeciles not understand that not everyone is wealthy enough to be in a position to afford one of Fred Done's luxury apartments? I have lived in this area for coming up to 7 years now and although that is a relatively short time compared to others who have lived here far longer, even I have noticed the negative change being thrust upon us as historic buildings are torn down all around in order to facilitate the developers in their quest to make more money by attracting people into the area from outside of Salford, riding on the back of the prestige of living so close to Manchester. Luxury high-rises now tower above us and although I admit we do need to provide new homes, these homes should be affordable to everyone in Salford, not just the rich. I see on the Salford Online facebook group the words 'Salford, Sold by the Pound' all the time and I totally agree, this is gentrification, nothing more, nothing less. I have to ask just who is benefitting from all of this new regeneration as it is most certainly not the existing population as they get pushed further and further out of the area they have called home. Salford Council should be grasping at the chance to provide affordable rental properties, not shutting down such much-needed developments. It is bewilderingly crazy. Colin J Full Name and Address Supplied
  20. It has been over one year since the heartbreaking scenes of devastation hit the news after a fire tore through a building wrapped in the same combustible cladding as used on many Salford residential tower blocks. A resident of one of those blocks wrote into postbag to tell of his anger and upset at what he views as a lack of action by Salford City Council and Pendleton Together. ---- I am one of many residents who live in one of the Pendleton Tower Blocks that have similar cladding and insulation to the Grenfell Tower Block. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } Shortly after the Grenfell Tower Fire, the Salford Mayor Paul Dennett announced to the media that all cladding from their nine blocks would be tested and if the tests failed it would be removed. In a later press release, it was revealed he was borrowing £25 million to replace the cladding. Now over a year on from Grenfell, what has happened to the Nine Tower Blocks owned by Salford City Council and run by Pendleton Together? 1) Fire Marshals were put in the Nine Blocks to patrol 24/7. However, we have recently found out that the so-called Fire Marshals have only just recently had training for doing this job. What training we don’t know. 2) Salford City Council/Pendleton Together removed the unsafe cladding from all Nine Blocks, but only the first three floors of each block and replaced it with what Salford City Council and Pendleton Together told residents was a safe boarding. 3) Pendleton Together then told residents to remove all doormats from outside their doors (most doormats are or were fire resistant). If the mats were not removed, the cleaning teams were told to remove them and they were then binned without any further notice to the residents. 4) Pendleton Together then told vehicle owners they could not park in the first two parking spaces that were closest to the building. Every block was supposedly told this, however, if you go round the blocks you will see this is not enforced on all blocks. It is on Thorn but not on Spruce where cars are parked within a couple of feet from the building wall and the same applies to some of the other blocks in the square. 5) The residents of Thorn were also told to remove plastic flower pots from alongside the building. When asked why we were told they could catch fire. Also, chairs and tables were removed from the community garden for the same reason and that the fire service had told Pendleton Together to enforce this. However, when the fire service was asked about this by residents, the residents were told that they had not told Pendleton Together this and that Pendleton Together has taken it upon themselves to implement the rule. 6) Salford City Council and Pendleton Together then decide to install fire alarms in the Tower Block but these are as much use a fire extinguisher that is empty! Why? Because the fire alarms were placed in the stairwell and not on landings, there is a fire door on each landing that acts like a sound buffer so most residents cannot hear the alarm in their flats when they are tested each week. 7) Salford City Council and Pendleton Together in their ultimate wisdom have decided to install new fire alarms and sprinklers in every flat. That consultation was months ago but as they say, silence is golden and in Salford City Councils and Pendleton Together case the silence is deafening. We the residents have not been told if this is going to happen and if so when it will happen. And who at the end of the day is going to be picking up the cost of redecorating residents flats when every room is going to be affected? Pendleton Together is constantly telling us that the safety of their residents is a top priority. Well, it seems something has been lost in the pipeline with their own policy. On Friday the 6th July 2018, one of the hottest days so far, some bright spark from Pendleton Together decided to remove fire extinguishers from the nine blocks that still have the unsafe cladding on them. And no one from Pendleton Together had the decency to contact any member of the resident's committee of Thorn Court to inform them that the fire extinguishers were being removed from the community room and community room kitchen. When a member of the resident's committee contacted Pendleton Together, the housing officer informed him they had been removed in error and would be on the way back to the block, this was at 2:00 pm by 5.30pm the committee member checked to see if the items had been returned. They had not and everyone at Pendleton Together had left the office. So the out of hours service was contacted and after some time two of the three fire extinguishers were returned by the fire marshals. They said that no one from Pendleton Together had informed them that these were being removed. So far no one from Pendleton Together has responded to a voice message I left on Friday. A resident of Thorn Court Name and Address Supplied NB: The views above are those of the letter author and do not represent those of Salford Voice.
  21. He went missing on the 5th of July from Salford Royal (Hope). Paul is described as 6ft with a scar on his left arm. Any sightings or information please contact the Police on 101 or 999 should you feel it necessary to do so.
  22. SHOTS FIRED AT HOUSE IN ECCLES

    Update: Police have now issued the following statement. We are hearing unconfirmed reports of up to seven shots fired at a house in the Patricroft area of Eccles during the early hours of Saturday morning (07/07/18). Residents in and around Armitage Road in Eccles told us that they were woken by the sounds of what appeared to be gun shots, apparently targetted at a property at the end of the street. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } Police placed a cordon around Station Road and errected a white tent outside a property at the junction with Armitage Street. Local residents reported seeing police dogs in the area as well as what appeared to be armed police officers but we are told that they have now since vacated and the operation seems to have been scaled back. According to sources on social media, the property was empty at the time as the resident was not at home. It is believed that windows were smashed at the same property in another incident earlier in the week. Anybody with information should contact police on 0161 856 8361 or the independent charity Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111.
  23. The collision forced the motorbike and its 30-year-old rider to cross the central reservation onto the northbound carriageway of the road. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } Emergency services responded and both were taken to hospital for treatment. The woman sustained multiple serious injuries and her condition is described as life-threatening. The man on the motorbike sustained a serious facial injury. PC Phil Shaw, of GMP’s Serious Collision Investigation Unit, said: Anyone with information should contact GMP’s Serious Collision Investigation Unit on 0161 856 4741 or the independent charity Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111.
  24. At around 4.20pm on Monday 25 June a woman was getting her two-year-old son out of his pushchair on Broadstone Hall Road South, at the junction with St Mary’s Drive, when she heard two popping sounds. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } The child began to scream and the mother noticed blood on his right hand. She assumed his hand had become trapped in the pram and quickly took him home, before deciding to take him to hospital. As she arrived at hospital, she noticed a small metal pellet in the bottom of the pushchair. Police now believe the child was shot with a pellet gun and are appealing for information. PC Matthew Beaden from GMP’s Stockport Division said: Anyone with information should call police on 0161 856 9619 or the independent charity Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111.
  25. On Thursday 28 June 2018, police were called to reports that a group of people had forced their way into a property on Levenhurst Road, Cheetham Hill armed with shovels, spades and knives and made threats against the occupants. .map-responsive{ overflow:hidden; padding-bottom:32.4%; position:relative; height:0; border: 2px solid #fff; background: #262e33; border-radius: 2px 2px 2px 2px; } An investigation was launched and on 2 July 2018 officers from the City of Manchester policing team executed a number of warrants across Cheetham Hill, Blackley and Salford. The following people were charged with violent disorder and appeared at Manchester Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday 3 July, where they were bailed to appear at Manchester Crown Court on Tuesday 31 July 2018. · Aaron Costello (02/02/1993) of Cheshill Court, Salford · Lorenzo Kavanah (02/01/1996) of Denman Walk, Cheetham Hill · Kevin Duhausse (31/07/1994) of Plant Hill Rd, Blackley · Tammy Murray (19/05/1990) of Camp Street, Salford · Two boys aged 16 and 17 from the Cheetham Hill area who cannot be named for legal reasons A 16-year-old boy from Cheetham Hill who also cannot be named for legal reasons, and who was arrested for theft of motor vehicle and possession of Class B drugs, has been released under investigation.


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